In which I confirm my existence

Well, six months went by in a flash.

All is mostly well.

I’d been writing here to document my “sandwich generation” experience, sharing the humor as well as the trials and tribulations that come with having a parent with dementia. While things are still humorous (it’s life!) we did have some more on the trials and tribulations end of the scale this fall.

For one thing, there was a mishap in Mom’s kitchen. For reasons unknown, she got up at 4:30 one Thursday morning and put a plastic tray on the stove. Dad awoke to the smoke detector half an hour later. They got the stove turned off and the smoke aired out. Mom went back to bed.

Dad called her neurologist’s office, thinking that surely her medication could be adjusted, or there would be something else the doctor could do that would prevent this ever happening again. (I don’t think he’s quite come to terms with the fact that things are going to get worse.) They played phone tag that day and the next, and he became increasingly frustrated. Friday evening he called me in a total fit because he couldn’t get the answering machine to work. I said I’d bring the girls over for dinner and fix it.

We arrived with pizza in hand to find the kitchen and some of the rest of the house coated with greasy black soot. He’d told me nothing about the kitchen incident — I thought I was going to solve the answering machine problem. I would never have brought the girls, let alone food, into that setting had I known.

Josie’s eyes got huge and filled with tears. “I don’t like this, Mommy. There is something wrong here and I’m scared.” Robin went instantly into “cope” mode, in which she is totally amazing. She comforted her sister, found a relatively clean place for us to eat, loaded and ran the dishwasher.

Meanwhile I pieced together the story from Dad, and went in to the bedroom to talk to Mom about it. “Mom,” I said. “You had a lot of smoke in the kitchen, I see.”

Her response? “Really? Wow!” And, later, “am I supposed to be feeling somehow responsible for this?” (Days later, to me, “you know, your father hasn’t been himself lately. I think he had something to do with what happened in the kitchen.” If by that you mean saving things from being much worse, Mom, then yes. Yes, he did.)

Long, long story short: the house was cleaned by specially trained professionals in a process that took two weeks. The stove could not be salvaged. Insurance company hassles were minimal, but not zero.

Also: my mother has been admonished by her doctor not to consume a bottle of Chardonnay along with her medication in the evenings. This falls in the category of “things you don’t think you’d have to say out loud,” but evidently it was necessary. She’s been pretty good about it since, as far as I know.

Rick and I are doing our utmost to convince them to sell their house and move to an assisted living community. Stay tuned.

 

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