What to do about anger?

I can’t bear to go through all the details of yesterday’s phone call to Mom. Suffice to say that it contained all the usual elements:

  • She was still asleep when I called in late morning.
  • She’d just woken up when I called again at noon.
  • She said back pain kept her up all night.
  • She didn’t know what day it is, and didn’t remember when I told her. Not the first time, not the 8th.
  • She was confused by the number of pills in her box, reporting 4 when there ought to have been 6 1/2. She said today’s compartment was empty, then said it did have pills in it, but not enough. She asked why Wednesday has no pills at all and what will she do then, not remembering that I’ll be back to refill the box. This exchange was repeated at least four times.

In a new twist, she took my Dad’s pills instead of her own, even though her pill box is bright purple, chosen specifically to be very distinct from Dad’s. At least that explains there only being 4 pills. (Fortunately Dad’s were only supplements; he keeps the important stuff separate.) Then she realized her error and took her own, of which there were 6 1/2, as I’d been saying all along (this is now 45 minutes into the call). She said she had been confused and in a rush because I was coming. I was never coming, and had never said I was coming, and it wouldn’t have been a reason to rush, in any case.

This is what dementia sounds like. Nothing she says can be trusted to have any consistent or correlative relationship to reality. When a normal person gets “confused,” they can be set straight. Oh, right, they’ll say. I was just confused. When a dementia patient is confused, talking them through it is like screwing yourself deeper and deeper into the marsh mud at low tide. Then the tide comes in.

All this happened while Robin and I were on the way from shopping to my friend Jolene’s house. We had the Corolla, because Aaron has “my” minivan up in New Hampshire for the weekend. I hate this reliable little car with the intensity of a thousand suns. It’s ugly, uncomfortable, cramped, loud, dirty (Aaron cares much less about keeping it clean than I do), and lacks Bluetooth. The minivan is not a luxury vehicle by any means, but neither is it any of those things, and Bluetooth makes phone calls so much safer and easier.

Robin and I had had an unsuccessful time shopping and were dashing back to pick up Jolene’s son, who’d be spending the afternoon at our house while she worked. I was cranky about the shopping trip. I was cranky about the car. I was cranky about having agreed to have a friend over. I had a headache and the beginnings of cramps. And then I had this hour-long conversation which made no fucking sense, and which, if I could have typed out a transcript, you would not even believe.

When we signed off, I screamed — screamed! — in frustration. Poor Robin. I told her that if I ever begin to do this kind of thing to her, that she should kill me. That, well, ok, obviously she could not be expected to kill me, but she should put me in a home and then move as far away as fucking possible and never look back. I will not allow her life to be sucked up by this kind of thing. I will not allow it. I will NOT.

It was at about that point that I realized my phone had not, in fact, hung up. I had thrown it into the passenger foot well when I said good-bye, but hadn’t disconnected. It is possible that my Dad–it was he on the phone at the end of the conversation–heard my whole poisonous, insane, horrible rant.

I understand that dementia is not my mother’s fault. I understand that being angry about it is normal (and so does Robin. She is a tremendous comfort). I try to keep anger about her illness from becoming anger at her for not being able to think and anger at my Dad for not being more managerial about it (he is blind, yes, but he can think, and he knows what fucking day it is, and he could help with the medicine thing).

It can feel like a lot of anger, which has never been my strong suit.

We got to Jolene’s house, and she asked how I was, and for once, I didn’t turn back the attention and say “fine, you?” I just laid it out. Empty. I’m running on empty. My parents have sucked me dry today and I have nothing left except feeling angry all the time. She listened, and she helped, and it was so good to have a friend in that moment that the stupid aggravations evaporated and the serious issues receded.

Having Josh over was fun. He and the girls played Clue, had a soccer ball punting contest in the backyard, played Wii, and watched Sherlock. Meanwhile I called my parents again, prepared to face their reaction to what they might have overheard earlier. They never mentioned it, and nothing in their demeanor suggested they heard any of it. Jolene said they had probably just put their phone right down after saying good-bye. If they heard anything at all it would only have been car noise from where my phone had lain on the floor. I’m going to assume, with relief, that she’s right.

After Jolene finished work, we all went out to dinner and talked about other things. My friends are terrific, and my girls are terrific, and I’m feeling better.

I’m still wondering what people do with their anger, though. I’m open to suggestions.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s