Big Changes: Mom Edition

Over the last many months, I have been researching places for Mom to live after Dad died (with 12 years between them, it was a fair bet he’d predecease her). Several memory care assisted living places have been built nearby in recent years, and existing assisted living communities have added memory care to their offerings. It’s a growing need, for sure. Generally, these are not places where couples go to live together, so they weren’t viable considerations till Dad passed. Still, I collected brochures, gathered hints from people I know who work in the industry, and listened closely to other adult children tell their stories.

It is strange to me that we are so isolated in this process. Each family kind of has to invent the wheel for themselves. There is so much anxiety, and so little shared wisdom. The closest thing I can compare it to is applying to college, but in that, the anxiety comes from too much information about what other families are doing. There’s always the sense that everyone else is thinking of something you’ve forgotten, or that they’ve gotten better organized sooner, or something. With elder care, it’s anxiety borne of isolation. There’s no pathway to it that families take together or in parallel. It seems to me that as a society, we are kind of getting it wrong.

But I digress.

Some assisted living communities have memory care components; others are designed specifically and only for memory care. Some have all-inclusive pricing; others have tiered or itemized price lists. There are different settings, cultures, philosophies and programming at each. It is so much to consider, and the worst thing is to have to do it in a hurry; yet, many of us are in precisely that position. We need a place for a parent, stat. I did the best I could ahead of time and still feel it wasn’t enough.

Soon after Dad died, I made an appointment to tour the place I had liked best on paper and online. It was everything I could have hoped for, but expensive, so I needed time to be sure that my mother’s income and assets could make it work. I couldn’t commit right away and while I hated to let it go, had to pass up an available room. A couple of weeks later, when Mom was feeling up to checking the place out herself, Robin and I brought her there for the day. I thought she would have mixed feelings and we’d be in for a big discussion, but she liked it, and even said we should leave a deposit! By this time I knew I should not pass up the opportunity.

So it came to be that just six weeks after my father’s death, Aaron and Robin and I moved my mother into a memory care assisted living facility just 20 minutes’ drive from my house. She’s been so brave about giving up her familiar surroundings so soon after losing her husband of 52 years. It is early days yet but she seems to be adjusting fairly well… which is not to say she’s constantly delighted, but that she’s not going through anything that isn’t to be expected.

As for me, it is taking some getting used to not having to call her several times a day, and not living with the constant background anxiety that I might get an emergency phone call at any time of the night. There is very much to do at my parents’ house down Cape, but that is all just stuff. The emotional changes are profound and will take some time to realize. It is a mix of grief, relief, sympathy, exultation, sadness, happiness… everything, just everything. Whatever the feeling of the moment, though, I know this was absolutely the right move.

It’s a new chapter.

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Big Changes: Dad Edition

Well. Some things have happened since last I wrote.

My father died 6 weeks ago. He hadn’t been feeling well but perked up just as I was about to take him to the doctor. We went for a haircut, then out for an omelet, which he ate with enthusiasm. Gusto, even. He was content and ready for a nap when I left him at home after lunch.

That night he had chest pain and was unable to get a breath. He was admitted to the hospital and found to have severe congestive heart failure. After several days he was discharged to hospice care at home, which I scrambled to supplement with 24-hour private care because my mother was in no way capable of managing things between hospice nurse visits.

Omelet day was a Tuesday; he came home the following Monday, and died that Friday. My brother and I and Mom, of course, were there.

It has been a blur of first doctors and nurses and health aides, then phone calls and emails, arrangements and announcements. We had a small service and I was so stressed the week before because I had to write and deliver a remembrance, and all I had was phrases and scraps of thoughts that wouldn’t complete. It came together eventually and I’m told it went over well.

Now there is the estate to settle and so many forms to fill out. So. Many. Forms.

In the meantime, my mother still has dementia… and now has lost her husband of 52 years. She’s heartbroken, lonely, incredibly needy, and increasingly frantic and forgetful. I increased the frequency of my own visits and outside care in her home, and called her many times a day on top of it. Still, she managed to flood a bathroom, and I had to call a disaster restoration company (which I already had in my contacts due to her kitchen fire incident a few years back) to dry things up and take away sodden carpets, etc. That was the week of my Dad’s funeral, so at least I had nothing else to do. Har.

Anyway. I have had to compartmentalize grief for my Dad to handle care for my Mom. It hits at strange times out of the blue, but as long as I keep moving, I am OK.

Sometimes as I’m managing one or another of the thousand-and-one things there are to manage, I say “I’m doing it, Dad. I’m doing it. It’s all OK.” He was so worried about dying and leaving me to deal with all the stuff in the house. But the stuff is the least of it. Stuff is just stuff. It’s nothing. Mom, unhappy and unsafe alone in the house, is the bigger issue.