About Leslie

I'm a work-at-home parent of two daughters, wife of one husband, and daughter of two elderly parents who live a half hour away. We live in the lovely New England town of Sandwich, MA. With my girls no longer little but not yet grown, and my parents needing more of my help than ever before, I'm feeling the "sandwich" in "sandwich generation." Good thing I like sandwiches.

All the Doctors

We had another medical appointment today–a follow-up with Mom’s primary care physician, whom I’ll call Dr. Striker. There was no particular reason to see him except to keep the appointment. As the person solely responsible for scheduling, providing transportation to, sitting in on, and managing all the information from all medical appointments for both my parents, I am beginning to wonder why we have to be such frequent fliers in all these places.

For Mom, in addition to Striker, we see Dr. Wolf, neurologist; Dr. King, urologist; Dr. East, gastroenterologist; Dr. Hawthorn, cardiologist; Dr. Hamilton, dentist; Dr. Randall, neurosurgeon; Dr. Odon, ophthamologist; Dr. Forrest, otolaryngologist; Dr. Lancaster, psychiatrist. I’m sure there are others I’ve forgotten. It just now occurs to me that I have no idea who her gynecologist is, or whether she should be seeing one. I have no plans to look into it.

Dad visits many of these same people, and additional eye doctors: Dr. Neuburger, glaucoma specialist, and Dr. Fenly, retina specialist. Did I mention he’s blind? Every time we see these people they say, essentially, “no, your vision is never coming back. Yes, that must be hard. See you next time!’

After a couple years in this role, I have finally smartened up. I now stretch out the intervals between non-issue “follow-up” visits to various doctors as widely as I can, and in the case of Hawthorn at least, I schedule Mom and Dad for the same time. Neither of them currently has any cardiac problems, but they both see Hawthorn every six months. That puts me in his office four times a year. We’re becoming friends. I recently noticed he stopped wearing a wedding ring and wondered what it would be like to know him in a different context.

It’s a bit much, frankly.

Anyway, there we were in Striker’s office. Mom’s lost quite a bit of weight–40 pounds in six months–which is excellent for many reasons, especially reducing back pain, but nobody can tell why it is happening. She’s proud to say she’s walking back and forth down the hall a lot. That’s great and all, but nobody loses almost two pounds a week from shuffling from kitchen to bathroom. A more likely explanation is that she’s not eating nearly as much as she used to. When we go out for lunch at her favorite restaurant, she always finishes her meal and gets dessert, so I can only imagine that she isn’t eating at home. Striker said the weight loss is good but he’d like to see her again in 4 months, because of course he would.

The major complaints today were the same as they’ve been for years: chronic cough, chronic shortness of breath. I don’t know what to make of the cough, and neither does anyone she talks to about it. It’s no mystery, though, why someone for whom a 30-foot walk constitutes “exercise” is chronically short of breath. Hawthorn, seeing no cardiac explanation, had ordered a CT scan of her lungs, which Striker reported revealed “mild” pulmonary fibrosis. He says “mild” means it wouldn’t probably account for the near-constant panting, but who knows.

We shall now pursue this mystery with a pulmonologist, because we hadn’t yet collected one of those.

Asking God to fix it

There was a time when my non-belief in a supreme supernatural being would have upset (offended?) my mother quite a lot.

It’s not something we talk much about. When my daughters were babies (OK, Josie was 2 1/2…) I had them baptized in the Episcopal church, mostly to check that box for my parents’ sake. When Mom noticed I wasn’t taking them to church much afterwards, I explained why it wasn’t right for us without touching on the “because there is no god” part. When she said “well, it’s not like you’re an atheist. That would be really painful for your Dad and me,” I let it go, because it doesn’t matter. It’s not about her, or Dad (whose true feelings I don’t actually know). It’s not a position I need to defend or discuss. I don’t proselytize.

Fast forward a decade: In the car last week, she was talking about how my Dad’s suffering (blindness, ostomy) upsets her. “I love him so much. Every night I pray to God to heal his eyes, and nothing ever happens. I don’t know what to make of that.”

I didn’t say that what to make of that is that prayer is futile, unless doing it makes you feel better. The “power of prayer” isn’t in getting what you asked for.

Instead, I said “that’s a better question for Brian than for me, Mom.” Brian is the rector of my parents’ church. He’s checked in with them a couple times a year since they’ve been homebound. While it’s is not a role I hold in particularly high esteem, this is certainly his area of expertise. You bring taxes to your accountant. You bring questions of faith to your priest.

“So, would you call yourself a non-believer?” Ah… a direct question. I’m not gonna argue, but I’m not gonna lie, either. “Yes, I would say that.”

Pause. Then she talked a bit about how she’d been going to church and taught about Jesus since her earliest childhood. Faith, she was saying, is part of who she is.

I thought more about that. My mother’s always been a churchgoer, and an involved one. When I was about 6, she hosted a small serious gathering in our home at which a woman (the horror!) performed the Eucharist. It was the early 1970s and such things, I guess, were Not Done. I had the impression that we were breaking serious barriers in our dining room, behind drawn shades. It felt subversive and important and right. We were feminist radicals!

Through the years, she served on vestries, search committees, and, always very proudly, as a lay reader. In retirement she enrolled in a program for laypeople called “Education for Ministry.” It’s a four-year study, and I don’t think she finished it, but still: This is someone who wasn’t just a parishoner, but who actively pursued theological understanding, to some degree.

Now, she’s puzzled that God doesn’t fix what’s wrong with her 87 year-old husband, because she’s asking REALLY HARD AND A LOT.

It would be senseless and cruel to get into this with her. In the years when she had the wherewithal for the conversation, she was a critical and judging person with whom discussion would have been pointless. Now that she’s more agreeable, she hasn’t the brain power.

I just can’t help but wonder what the human condition could be if some of the energy that goes into pleading for divine guidance were directed instead into action here on Earth. Yes, I know that’s flawed reasoning… “energy” isn’t finite and you can pray and act, both. But still. Still.

Out to Lunch

Mom: What’s the special?

Me, reading: Tuna salad on toasted rye bread with melted pepper jack cheese, sour cream, and pico de gallo. It comes with french fries, onion rings, or cole slaw.

Mom: No, thank you, that’s what I had for breakfast.


Mom: What did I have for dessert the last time we were here?

Dad: Tiramisu.

Mom: What is that?

Me: A layered dessert with coffee-soaked sponge cake, mascarpone cheese whipped with eggs and sugar, and powdered chocolate.

Mom: What is that?

Dad: Tiramisu.

Mom: Have I had that before?

Humblebrag?

I was in a department store check-out line today, with the rest of New England, buying a present for Robin from my parents. There was general chit-chat about how everyone is getting through the holidays — a conversation I’d started by asking the woman behind the counter how she was holding up, and she just shaking her head.

The lady behind me got going on and on about how materialistic her daughter is. It’s all about what she’s getting, she said. She demands to know on a daily basis what items from her list have been purchased already. All she cares about is her presents. She’s addicted to shopping and all she wants in life is to buy things.

Even the young woman behind the counter was all like, “Lady, then you are not helping her by being here. You should get her NOTHING.”

And I did not ask this mother, “how have you managed to raise such a complete little shit?”

But I did say, “Wow. That seems to be a bullet we dodged, at our house.”

“Oh, then you have boys?” Nope.

“Oh, well then they’re not teenagers?” Actually yes.

“Oh. Well mine is just addicted to shopping. Wait till she finds out you have to pay rent and buy groceries too.” How old is she? “25.”

Lady, if my kid ever behaved like you’ve just admitted to a total stranger that yours does as a young adult, I would make a donation in her name to the International Rescue Committee, then write her a card expressing hope for her to become a better person and strongly suggesting that she never again give me a wish list of any kind, ever.

Merry Christmas.

What to do about anger?

I can’t bear to go through all the details of yesterday’s phone call to Mom. Suffice to say that it contained all the usual elements:

  • She was still asleep when I called in late morning.
  • She’d just woken up when I called again at noon.
  • She said back pain kept her up all night.
  • She didn’t know what day it is, and didn’t remember when I told her. Not the first time, not the 8th.
  • She was confused by the number of pills in her box, reporting 4 when there ought to have been 6 1/2. She said today’s compartment was empty, then said it did have pills in it, but not enough. She asked why Wednesday has no pills at all and what will she do then, not remembering that I’ll be back to refill the box. This exchange was repeated at least four times.

In a new twist, she took my Dad’s pills instead of her own, even though her pill box is bright purple, chosen specifically to be very distinct from Dad’s. At least that explains there only being 4 pills. (Fortunately Dad’s were only supplements; he keeps the important stuff separate.) Then she realized her error and took her own, of which there were 6 1/2, as I’d been saying all along (this is now 45 minutes into the call). She said she had been confused and in a rush because I was coming. I was never coming, and had never said I was coming, and it wouldn’t have been a reason to rush, in any case.

This is what dementia sounds like. Nothing she says can be trusted to have any consistent or correlative relationship to reality. When a normal person gets “confused,” they can be set straight. Oh, right, they’ll say. I was just confused. When a dementia patient is confused, talking them through it is like screwing yourself deeper and deeper into the marsh mud at low tide. Then the tide comes in.

All this happened while Robin and I were on the way from shopping to my friend Jolene’s house. We had the Corolla, because Aaron has “my” minivan up in New Hampshire for the weekend. I hate this reliable little car with the intensity of a thousand suns. It’s ugly, uncomfortable, cramped, loud, dirty (Aaron cares much less about keeping it clean than I do), and lacks Bluetooth. The minivan is not a luxury vehicle by any means, but neither is it any of those things, and Bluetooth makes phone calls so much safer and easier.

Robin and I had had an unsuccessful time shopping and were dashing back to pick up Jolene’s son, who’d be spending the afternoon at our house while she worked. I was cranky about the shopping trip. I was cranky about the car. I was cranky about having agreed to have a friend over. I had a headache and the beginnings of cramps. And then I had this hour-long conversation which made no fucking sense, and which, if I could have typed out a transcript, you would not even believe.

When we signed off, I screamed — screamed! — in frustration. Poor Robin. I told her that if I ever begin to do this kind of thing to her, that she should kill me. That, well, ok, obviously she could not be expected to kill me, but she should put me in a home and then move as far away as fucking possible and never look back. I will not allow her life to be sucked up by this kind of thing. I will not allow it. I will NOT.

It was at about that point that I realized my phone had not, in fact, hung up. I had thrown it into the passenger foot well when I said good-bye, but hadn’t disconnected. It is possible that my Dad–it was he on the phone at the end of the conversation–heard my whole poisonous, insane, horrible rant.

I understand that dementia is not my mother’s fault. I understand that being angry about it is normal (and so does Robin. She is a tremendous comfort). I try to keep anger about her illness from becoming anger at her for not being able to think and anger at my Dad for not being more managerial about it (he is blind, yes, but he can think, and he knows what fucking day it is, and he could help with the medicine thing).

It can feel like a lot of anger, which has never been my strong suit.

We got to Jolene’s house, and she asked how I was, and for once, I didn’t turn back the attention and say “fine, you?” I just laid it out. Empty. I’m running on empty. My parents have sucked me dry today and I have nothing left except feeling angry all the time. She listened, and she helped, and it was so good to have a friend in that moment that the stupid aggravations evaporated and the serious issues receded.

Having Josh over was fun. He and the girls played Clue, had a soccer ball punting contest in the backyard, played Wii, and watched Sherlock. Meanwhile I called my parents again, prepared to face their reaction to what they might have overheard earlier. They never mentioned it, and nothing in their demeanor suggested they heard any of it. Jolene said they had probably just put their phone right down after saying good-bye. If they heard anything at all it would only have been car noise from where my phone had lain on the floor. I’m going to assume, with relief, that she’s right.

After Jolene finished work, we all went out to dinner and talked about other things. My friends are terrific, and my girls are terrific, and I’m feeling better.

I’m still wondering what people do with their anger, though. I’m open to suggestions.

Medicinal Muddles

My mother’s memory troubles and general confusion have increased to the point where the possibility of her overdosing on her daily medicines is a constant worry.

Months ago, I wrote out a list of all her meds: brand name, generic name, dose, and purpose. She has handled this handwritten list so much that it is wearing thin. There are check marks penciled all over it. But this list was intended as a reference, not for checking off when pills were taken; a check mark on it is meaningless because it isn’t linked to any particular day.

I began to notice that she was needing refills of prescriptions about a week sooner than she should have run out. Then CVS said that insurance wouldn’t pay for a certain refill because it was too soon to fill, yet I couldn’t have her go without, so we paid full price for the anti-hallucination medicine.

Part of the problem is that she’s in such relentless back pain that she has a constant urge to take medicine to make the pain stop. There is no convincing her that hallucination medicine will not help her back pain.

Clearly Mom needed a way to remember whether she’s taken her pills. I tried to sell her on a pill organizer. She declined, saying the idea depressed her. I told her that I use one myself because the motions of taking medicine are so much the same, and the routine so mindless, that soon after I’ve done it, I can’t reliably say if I did it that day or if I’m remembering the day before. You don’t have to have dementia to forget this kind of thing! But no, she insisted, she wanted to stick with the pill bottles and a checklist.

So I devised several candidates for checklists, some from templates and some from scratch based on observations and guesses about what might work. She rejected all of them. Unchecked boxes were intimidating, and I think sharp black-on-white printouts made her nervous. I know that doesn’t make sense. But I started to notice that my computer-printed efforts stressed her out just to look at, no matter how simple and full of white space I made them, whereas she loves the handwritten page.

This makes me wonder if, in our later years, as our minds fail us, people all try to revert to the forms of communication we liked most during our lives. Handwriting on paper would definitely be the thing, in Mom’s case. It’s an unanswered question, because it’s only in the last few decades that these forms have changed as fast as they do now. But the rate of change increases all the time, so I wonder how it will play out, and if anyone is studying it in a gerontology program somewhere. I hope I’ll be able to keep up, but I picture myself pining for Excel spreadsheets long after there’s no longer any such thing, and I’m so fond of texting that I wonder if I’ll be able to adjust to whatever replaces it. I don’t know. If my giant paper calendar (color coded for each family member, natch) is any indication, I might have some trouble. (People used to see it and say “I like paper better, too.” Now they just say “oh, wow.”)

But I digress.

I now have Mom using a pill organizer with big compartments labeled S M T W TH F S. Every visit, I refill the compartments for the days ahead. At first, I’d look at the pill compartments and half of them would be empty and the other half filled with Advil. She would insist that she hadn’t taken any more pills than were in the box, and I would say but Mom, they’re gone, so where else did they go? I wanted to hire an aide, but she asked for “one more chance to get it right.”

We’ve compromised. I now call her every day to say it’s time to take the pills in that day’s compartment. She puts the phone down to get some water, and says OK, now what? and I tell her what compartment to open, and she counts the pills and describes them and asks is that right? and I say yes (with no small relief), and she takes them. Every day she asks me why she has no pills in the empty compartments, and I tell her it’s because she already took those. Every day she asks what happens when she runs out, and I tell her I will be back to refill the compartments.

This is working, at least temporarily. Someday she will have to have an aide come in every day to be sure she has taken her meds.

You may be wondering how Dad does. Turns out for managing medications, it’s more important to be able to think than to see, so he’s actually OK on this front. He keeps his meds in a kitchen drawer. One bottle has tape around the top, and one has a rubber band around the middle, and one is unaltered. He knows which is which and how much to take from each bottle, and I refill the bottles when he’s running low.

There are workarounds for blindness, as awful as it is. This slow, relentless failing of the mind, though? All we have are temporary patches to a system that is doomed to fall apart completely.

Haircuts

I took my parents to get their hair cut.

Mom used to go to a salon in Hyannis, but missed several appointments and is no longer welcome there. She didn’t appreciate that not showing up meant loss of income to her stylist, who sent a very gracious note wishing Mom well and explaining that she couldn’t accommodate those losses anymore.

Unwilling to visit a less posh salon closer to home, Mom didn’t get her hair cut for almost a year after that (don’t look at me, this is while she still had her driver’s license). Meanwhile, Dad was seeing his regular person, Tammy, just 10 minutes away.

Getting Dad from place to place can be quite a production. Eighty-six and blind, he doesn’t make quick strides, and he’s very easily startled by changes underfoot. From car to building, he has cane in one hand, me in the other; I’ve got him on one arm and everything else over the other shoulder. If it’s raining, add an umbrella. We shuffle along. It’s nice when someone holds a door.

When I first brought Dad to Tammy after Mom stopped driving, she came right to the door, opened it wide and swept him away as smoothly as you please. She offered just the right guidance and spoke at just the right volume about just the right things. And my Dad sat right down in her chair and proceeded to tell her All About It. They had a great time and I was so happily unnecessary it brought tears to my eyes. He came home looking handsome and feeling great. I tipped her exorbitantly.

Mom, in desperation, now agreed to see Tammy as well. I scheduled a midday appointment to get them both taken care of and me back to Sandwich in time for Robin’s volleyball game. Win-win (and-hopefully-win).

They were getting dressed when I arrived to pick them up. Dad needed help with small, stiff shirt buttons. He was mad that he couldn’t do them. I said “Dad, maybe you need to start wearing rugby shirts!” I was not entirely serious. However he is now obsessed with the idea of a rugby shirt, and I know what to get him for Christmas.

Sad news at the salon: Tammy was out due to injury. Rather than call to reschedule, the salon people had figured other stylists could fill in. This made me nervous and a bit resentful. Tammy is the whole point of that place. It’s not so great without her.

Stylists were hanging around discussing lunch orders, but Dad’s designated stand-in wasn’t even in the building. We were told she was delayed due to “the weather” (light rain). We waited. When she arrived and was asked if she wanted something from the cafe, she said “no, I picked up something on the way.” I think she realized mid-sentence how that came across.

A mystery: The ladies’ room in this place has no dryer or towels, so the inside door handle is always wet. But there’s a roll of paper towels on a table ten feet down the hall.

More mysteries: There is a lot of weird shit for sale crammed into the waiting area. Here is a partial list:

  • cocktail forks
  • a blouse
  • an electric egg cooker
  • a book by Dr. Phil
  • scented candles
  • a pair of metallic sandals
  • orange silicone kitchen utensils
  • loose tea
  • a scarf
  • Christmas ornaments (or fall? are fall ornaments a thing?)
  • a sequined black sweatshirt
  • an elaborately framed print of Cavalry, by Octavio Ocampo, which is a pretty creepy work of art no matter how you frame it.

It’s like that game where you look at a random assortment of items on a tray, and then someone takes away the tray and you have to list as many of the items as you can remember.

I’m in a constant state of low-grade confusion and irritability in this place. Why aren’t the paper towels in the bathroom? Where does all this crap come from and who would buy it? Where is the lady who’s going to cut my Dad’s hair? What is that other lady doing to my mother and how soon will it be before Mom starts saying things we will all regret? Why is all of this taking so long?

An hour and a half later, Mom had something like a bowl cut. Dad’s was better. Mom was persuaded to buy expensive tea tree shampoo to treat something on her scalp that I suspect would not exist if she shampooed more often. She was instructed not to use the expensive tea tree shampoo every day. That is not going to be an issue.

I’d thought we might go to lunch, but I was so fried that I just brought them home, paid the bills, brought in the mail, the newspapers and the garbage bin, consolidated some of Dad’s medicines in bottles he has marked in various ways to know by touch what they are, and set up Mom’s medications for the week ahead.

What I took away: Mom’s 2015 appointment calendar, with about 8 pounds of paper scraps tucked into it that I will scan through to be sure don’t include any legal documents (the car registration is MIA, for one thing); three catalogs to call and get her off their mailing list, again.

Another visit done.

I did make it to Robin’s game: a victory that left her in a fabulous mood all evening.

Oh, her aching back (no, really)

My mother suffers substantially from back pain. Over the last decade she’s had two spinal fusion surgeries and a hip replacement. We didn’t know about her dementia before the surgeries, but looking back I know she was distinctly worse after each one. Her immediate recovery periods were always nightmarish, and each time seemed to diminish her permanently.

It was after one of those surgeries that my father confessed to me his worry that she hadn’t been paying the bills. (Blind, he couldn’t pay them or verify her payment of them on his own.) He handed me a briefcase with the entire contents of her desk in it and we sat up till the wee hours sorting through stuff. That’s when I took over the bill paying. Diagnosis followed not long after. It’s been almost 5 years now.

At any rate, the pain has been ramping up again over the past year. Nobody thinks she can undergo another surgery. She’s been seeing a physiologist at Spaulding, who today performed a radiofrequency ablation procedure which will, we hope, deaden the nerve that is hurting her. It would be so great if it worked. Mom’s concentration is flighty enough; the pain makes it so she can’t tolerate standing for long, and you just know she isn’t listening to anything that’s said half the time because she’s distracted by how much she hurts.

So, we desperately want this to succeed.

She arrived for her procedure this morning in the car of a kind volunteer who drove her from Chatham so that I wouldn’t have to do two round trips. I met her at the door, and we checked in. She was absolutely calm (thank you Ativan — and thank goodness she managed to save the last two little pills for today.) The doctor’s assistant wheeled her away, and I headed to the cafeteria to sit with a coffee and go through my “Mom & Dad” binder, culling out of date papers.

I had a nice visit with a friend who works there. We talked about the mixed pride and heartbreak of sending a kid to college. I told her all the Facebook pictures of friends’ new college students are breaking my heart, as I’m half wrecked because my eldest just started high school and she STILL LIVES IN MY HOUSE. I am risking my Spock-like reputation by confessing to these things, but I do.

I saw my daughters’ 2nd grade teacher, since retired, a really great person who lost her son to addiction last year and somehow still puts one foot in front of the other.

I saw the physical therapist who told me I had an attitude problem when I said it would be nice to be done with the the pain in my shoulder for which I went to see her for help some weeks ago. We ignored each other with no love lost. That remark of hers still makes me angry whenever I recall it. The day she said that, I should have cancelled all the rest of my appointments.

Her assistant passed by and was lovely, though.

So 45 minutes went quickly by, and then Mom was asking for me in the recovery room. Her procedure reportedly went well. She was reclining next to a pile of snack wrappers. She’d eaten all the Lorna Doones and half the Ritz peanut butter crackers and was struggling to unwrap the Fig Newtons. This was not a procedure she’d had to fast for, by the way. She asked me, “do you drive to an office somewhere for the program you’re on?” I had no idea what she meant. “For losing weight,” she said. “No Mom. I’m not on a program. I just quit eating bagels and muffins and cookies, and got serious about walking more often.” “Oh. Did you read about that in a magazine?” and so on, for the duration of the Fig Newtons. My 200 pound mother in a recliner shoving junk food in her face asking me how I lost 10 pounds.

I brought the car around, she was helped into it, and we headed home. I’d told Dad to expect us at about 11:00. When we got in, he was asleep, but he jumped up, shouting “IT’S ONLY 10:26!” “Hi, Dad. 10:56 I think.” Dad checks his talking watch. “Oh, 10:56. All right. Hello.” By this time Mom’s tired enough to assure him all went well and then go right to bed for a nap.

With Mom asleep, I have the opportunity to assess the status of the fridge and freezer. Peapod delivered groceries yesterday so they’re in good supply. Excellent supply, you could say. Mom had ordered four gallons of milk and 36 yogurts and 8 bags of croutons, among other things. Dad was concerned that he couldn’t distinguish the individual rice pudding cups from the individual yogurt cups. We determined that the rice pudding cups have a unique dimple on the bottom, solving that difficulty. One less thing. I don’t tell him about the rotten food that I’m hauling away. There’s nothing he can do about that.

Thus concluded today’s adventure. What I took away: 3 gallons of milk, 3 lbs chicken breast (Mom doesn’t cook but hasn’t stopped shopping as if she does), 3 bags frozen peas, 1 bag frozen corn, 1 loaf of raisin bread, 1 salad bowl. All this I can use. In other bags: 2 dozen frozen bananas that are too far gone even to use for banana bread, 4 bags of rotting baby carrots, one open can of pecan pieces, one open box of 5-year-old Fibre One cereal, one plastic container of an ancient unidentified granular substance, and 1 gray withered slice of pizza in a Ziploc bag that, thank God, stays closed. All this I throw away in public trash cans before I get home.

When I finally do get home, it’s 12:30, and I sit down to work. The summer lull is over and I have actual writing to do for actual money. I’d be in better shape to do that if it didn’t feel like I’ve done a full day’s work already.

Blink! First day of school.

Summer flew, as summers fly. Robin did her “nerd camp” and then a volleyball skills camp. Josie, as promised, did “nothing,” which means she reread all the Harry Potter books and invented board games and wrote trivia questions and swam and did a kids’ triathlon and spent time with her parents and grandparents. Aaron worked on the house. I had a lull in my workflow. We all went to California to visit the west coast contingent of Aaron’s family and do some sightseeing.

In most years I’m overjoyed to get everyone (including me) back into a routine come September. I love it down to my bones, the new edge to the air, the earlier nightfall, the promise of all we’ll learn and do and feel when we get Back To It.

This year’s different. Robin’s starting high school, Josie middle school. I don’t have a child in elementary school any more. And it just seems like with the start of this school year, I’m one big step closer to their leaving me. I know, that’s as it should be. I know, it’s no more significant than any other sunrise in the inevitable march of time. I know, they were always going to leave, and I know, something would be wrong if they didn’t.

But yesterday nobody in our house was a high school student. Today, someone is. College is, like, tomorrow.

I have so little time left with them, and it’s hitting me kind of hard, just now.

To our bus driver, on the last day of school

Dear Ben,

I am remembering Robin’s first day of kindergarten, when she was barely 5 years old, and so serious, brave and quiet, and so focused on riding that bus. Her little frog backpack was firmly in place and her little gaze so determined. You pulled to a stop at the corner, and she marched right up the bus steps as soon as the door opened! And you could have waved and gone on, but instead you said, “oh sweetie, give your Mommy a hug first. She needs one today.” You were so kind to do that. She was a little startled that she’d forgotten, and left for school happier after that hug. And oh yes, I did need one that day.

The seasons passed and every day, Josie would come to the bus stop with us to see Robin off. She’d wave at you and show you her favorite mittens (every day, all winter long) and tell you the latest news. I have no idea if you could hear much of what she babbled over the bus engine, but you always responded as if it were the most important news you’d hear all week. One day, she announced at the top of her lungs, “I’M 4! AND I’M GOING TO PRESCHOOL! AND I CAN WIPE MY OWN BUM!” and you said, “OH, WOW!” …because, well, wow.

Those have become treasured family stories, and you’ve been a treasured presence in my girls’ young lives. I know we are only one of many families who feel this way. We are so grateful. Thank you.

Have a wonderful summer. We will see each other around town, and we’ll always wave at the bus!